Livingstone Shire

Livingstone Shire Council encompasses 11,780 square kilometres which is 1.1% of Queensland. Our current population of 36,378 is projected to grow to 62,226 by 2031. The Livingstone Shire’s landscape is rich in diversity with expansive coastline, hinterland, national parks, rainforest and islands.

The Shire’s population is just as diverse in its characteristics with the region embracing strong growth across all age groups and demographics.

Climate

The Livingstone Shire Council area enjoys a subtropical climate with wet summers and low winter rainfall. Yeppoon’s highest mean monthly maximum temperature is 29.3°C in January. July has the lowest mean monthly minimum temperature in Yeppoon, 11.8°C. Yeppoon’s highest mean monthly rainfall in February (173.6 mm) and lowest mean monthly rainfall is in July, with 29.6 mm.

Population

Our current population of 36,378 is projected to grow to 62,226 by 2031. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicates that the Livingstone Shire Council area, at 30 June 2013, had a greater proportion of persons aged 45 years and over when compared with Queensland. The largest percentage difference between the Council area and Queensland was those persons aged 20 to 24 years (2.0 percentage point difference).

Education

  • 566 apprentices and trainees, June 2014
  • 78 school-based apprentices and trainees, June 2014
  • 7,140 students undertook vocational education and training, 2011-12
  • 2,233 students enrolled at CQUniversity, Rockhampton Campus, 2013
  • 51.9% of persons 15 years and over held a non-school qualification, 2011 Census
  • Engineering and related technologies was the most common field of qualification
  • 13 primary schools and 3 secondary schools
  • 61.8% of 4,839 school students attended government schools, Livingstone Shire Council area, 2013.

At 30 June 2014, a total of 566 apprentices and trainees were in training in the Livingstone Shire Council area. The largest industry training group was construction (149 persons), followed by mining (82 persons) and manufacturing (78 persons). The industry training group with the largest increase in apprentice and trainee numbers between 30 June 2013 and 30 June 2014 was mining (27 persons), followed by construction (18 persons). Manufacturing experienced the largest decline in apprentice and trainee numbers between the two periods (28 persons), followed by administrative and support services (22 persons).
At 30 June 2014, 78 school-based apprentices and trainees were in training in the Livingstone Shire Council area. The largest group of school-based apprentices and trainees was in other services (23.1%), followed by electricity, gas, water and waste services (16.7%) and accommodation (15.4%). The largest increase in school-based apprentices and trainees between 2013 and 2014 was in accommodation (6 persons). The industry training group with the largest decline was construction (5 persons).

During 2011-12, 7,140 students were in vocational education and training in the Rockhampton and Capricorn Coast region. This was 363 more students than in 2010-11. The industry training group of business made up the largest number of vocational education and training students in the area (991 students), followed closely by community services (958 students) and hospitality (865 students).

Between 2010-11 and 2011-12 hospitality had the greatest increase in student numbers (237 students), followed by engineering (221 students). General education and training had the largest decline in student numbers (142 students), followed by food processing (122 students).

The Rockhampton campus of CQUniversity is situated in the Capricorn Region. In 2012, there were 1,758 students enrolled at the Rockhampton campus.

Within the Rockhampton campus in 2013, the largest number of students were enrolled in the Bachelor of Engineering (Co-op) / Diploma of Professional Practice (1,256 students), followed by Bachelor of Nursing (1,252 students), Bachelor of Learning Management (Early Childhood) (693 students) and Bachelor of Learning Management (Primary) (638 students).
Of persons aged 15 years and over in the Livingstone Shire Council area at the time of the 2011 Census, 51.9% (13,538 persons) held a non-school educational qualification, compared with 54.2% (1,875,323 persons) in Queensland.
In the region, the proportion of persons with a non-school qualification was less than that of Queensland for Bachelor degree or higher and advanced diploma and diploma. The proportion of Livingstone Shire Council area residents with a certificate was higher than in Queensland.

In the Livingstone Shire Council area at the time of the 2011 Census, the most common field of qualification was in engineering and related technologies (20.3%). This was also the most popular field of study for Queensland (16.8%). Management and commerce was the second most popular field of study for the Livingstone Shire Council area (12.0%), followed by education (8.5%).

There is a wide variety of primary and secondary school options in the Livingstone Shire Council area. In 2014, the region’s schools comprised 13 primary schools and 3 secondary schools.
Of the 4,839 primary and secondary school students in the Livingstone Shire Council area in 2013, 61.8% (2,990 students) were enrolled in government schools and 38.2% (1,849 students) were in non-government schools. The majority of primary school students attended government schools (72.8%), while more secondary school students attended non-government schools (54.6%).

Between 2008 and 2013, students attending government schools in the Livingstone Shire Council area have varied between 62.5% of total students to 61.8%. Conversely, students attending non-government schools have also varied from 37.5% of total students to 38.2%.

Employment

The total estimated labour force in the Livingstone Shire Council area for the December quarter 2014 was 18,277 persons. Between 2010 and 2014, the average annual growth rate of the labour force in the Livingstone Shire Council area was 3.9%.
At the time of the 2011 Census, 7,424 people worked in the Livingstone Shire Council area. Of these persons, 84.4% resided in the Council area. Eight hundred and eighty-eight persons resided in Rockhampton Regional Council area and worked in the Livingstone Shire Council area, while 36 persons resided in other states and territories and worked in the region.
Statistics from the Australian Taxation Office show that the mean taxable income of taxpayers in the Capricorn Coast and Rockhampton region for the 2009–10 financial year was $56,700. This was $102 less than the mean taxable income for Queensland ($56,802). Between the financial years 2008–09 and 2009-10, the mean taxable income in the Capricorn increased by $2,570 (4.7%). This was lower than Queensland for the same period ($2,674 or 4.9%).

Estimates of personal income show that the average total income for wage and salary earners in the Livingstone Shire Council area for the 2010-11 financial year was $52,149. This was $3,092 more than the average total income for Queensland ($49,057). The mean income from salaries and wages in the Livingstone Shire Council area for the 2010-11 financial year was $53,779. This was $3,916 more than the mean income for salaries and wages for Queensland ($49,863). Between the financial years 2009-10 and 2010-11, the mean income from salaries and wages in the Livingstone Shire Council area increased by $4,028 (8.1%). This was more than Queensland for the same period ($2,809 or 6.0%).

Employment by industry

  • Largest industry – construction
  • Total gross value of agricultural product, 2011 – $72.2m
  • Cattle and calves slaughtering continues to be the most valuable agricultural product
  • 70.8% of agricultural production – livestock slaughtering
  • $8,716.2m – overseas commodity exports from Fitzroy regional ports, 2012-13
  • Coal, coke and briquettes – main commodity exported in dollar value terms, 2012-13
  • Japan – major country of destination for exports, 2012-13
  • 10.7m tonnes – overseas exports of coal, coke and briquettes, September quarter 2013

Over the ten years to 2010-11, Queensland recorded an average annual growth in gross state product (GSP) of 4.1%. During this period, the Sunshine Coast was the fastest-growing region in Queensland, with real average annual growth in gross regional product (GRP) of 5.1%.

Other areas which experienced faster GRP growth than GSP included the Mackay (4.6%), Brisbane (4.7%) and Gold Coast (4.8%) regions. Darling Downs and Fitzroy experienced 3.7% and 3.5% average annual growth respectively during this period.

North West and South West experienced average annual growth significantly below that of real GSP, with 0.1% and 0.3% respectively.

Central West contracted during this period, with an average annual decline of 1.9% in GRP.

Mining is the prominent industry in Fitzroy, accounting for 34.0% of nominal gross value added (GVA) in 2010–11, up 7.6 percentage points from 2000–01. Construction, at 17.0%, and manufacturing, at 7.7%, were the next largest contributors to Fitzroy’s economy. The largest change in composition, other than mining, was observed in construction, up 11.0 percentage points from 2000–01. Agriculture, forestry and fishing recorded the largest fall in its share of nominal GVA, down 5.1 percentage points, followed by manufacturing, down 3.0 percentage points.

The total gross value of agricultural production in the Livingstone Shire Council area in 2010-11 was $72.2 million, or 9.4% of the Fitzroy Statistical Division. The most valuable agricultural product in the region for 2010-11 was cattle and calves slaughtered ($50.5 million). Cattle and calves slaughtered accounted for 6.6% of the Fitzroy SA4 gross agricultural production.

In 2010-11, livestock slaughtering made up 70.8% of the Livingstone Shire Council area’s total value of agricultural production. Fruit was proportionally the second highest agricultural commodity (10.5%), followed by vegetables (5.3%).
Queensland commodity exports are those which had a final stage of production or manufacture in Queensland. There are two trade ports located in the Fitzroy Statistical Division: Gladstone and Rockhampton. The value of overseas commodity exports originating in Queensland and exported from Fitzroy regional ports in 2012-13 was $8,716.2 million, 19.9% of the total value of Queensland’s merchandise exports ($43,711.7 million).

In dollar value terms in 2012-13, coal, coke and briquettes was the main type of Queensland-produced commodity exported from the Fitzroy Statistical Division ports (51.4%), followed by combined confidential items of trade (38.0%) and non-ferrous metals (8.0%). The specialisation ratio reflects the importance of a commodity exported from the region compared with Queensland as a whole. The major commodity with the highest specialisation ratio for the Fitzroy Statistical Division ports was combined confidential items (2.1), followed by crude fertilisers (1.3) and coal, coke and briquettes (1.2).

In 2012-13, Japan was the major country of destination for Queensland commodity exports from the region, accounting for 34.1% of the value of commodities exported, followed by India (17.4%) and China (16.8%). The major countries of destination with the highest specialisation ratio for the Fitzroy Statistical Division ports were Malawi (4.9), Oman (4.8) and Qatar (4.7).

In the September quarter 2013, overseas exports of coal, coke and briquettes from Fitzroy Statistical Division ports totalled 10.9 million tonnes. This was 0.6 million tonnes or 6.0% more than the June quarter 2013.

In 2012-13, Queensland commodities exported overseas from the Fitzroy Statistical Division ports decreased 27.4% (or $3,291.0 million) from 2011-12. The commodities exported from Fitzroy Statistical Division regional ports in 2012-13 with the most significant decreases in total value were coal, coke and briquettes (down $2,795.1 million) and combined confidential items (down $354.2 million). The commodities exported with the most significant increases in total value were vegetables and fruit (up $44.9 million or 334.3%) and feeding stuff for animals (up $14.2 million or 103.1%).

Business

  • 2,844 businesses registered, 2012-13
  • 22.5% of registered businesses were in construction
  • 26.9% of businesses had turnover $0 < $50k

In 2012-13, there were 2,844 businesses registered in the Livingstone Shire Council area. The largest industry was construction (22.5%), followed by agriculture, forestry and fishing (18.0%) and rental, hiring and real estate services (9.0%).

Of the 2,828 businesses registered in the Livingstone Shire Council area that had turnover in 2012-13, 27.9% reported a turnover of between $0 and less than $50,000, while 33.2% had between $50,000 and less than $200,000. A further 35.3% reported a turnover between $200,000 and less than $2 million. Turnover of $2 million or more was reported by 4.6% of businesses.

There was a 6.7% decrease from 2008-09 to 2012-13 in businesses reporting a turnover of between $50,000 and $100,000. There was a 26.5% increase in businesses reporting turnover of more than $2 million.

Housing

  • Median house price, year to December 2014 – $362,500
  • Median unit and townhouse price, year to December 2014 – $299,000
  • Median vacant urban land price, year to December 2014 – $175,000
  • Median weekly rent, December quarter 2014

The median house price for the Livingstone Shire Council area in the 12 months to the end of December 2014 was $362,500. This median price was more than that of Central Highlands and Cairns Regional Councils and Townsville City.
The median unit and townhouse price for the Livingstone Shire Council area was $299,000. The median unit/townhouse price decreased 8% over the year to the end of December 2014. The median vacant urban land price was $175,000, an increase of 1.8%.

  • $290, 2 bedroom flats or units
  • $330, 3 bedroom houses
  • $398, 4 bedroom houses
  • 351 residential dwelling approvals, year to December 2014
  • $101.8million – residential dwelling approvals
  • $14.7 million – non-residential building approvals
  • 391 lots approved in the year to September 2014

In the 12 months ending 31 December 2014, there were 351 new residential dwelling approvals in the Livingstone Shire Council area. Two-thirds (67.5%) of dwelling approvals were within the Yeppoon SA2, followed by 20.2% in the Emu Park SA2. Total residential building value in the year ending December 2014 for the region was $101.8 million, and accounted for 0.8% of residential building value in Queensland. Total building value for the Livingstone Shire Council area increased by 24.0% between the year ended December 2013 and the year ended December 2014.

The value of residential building approvals in the Livingstone Shire Council area during the December quarter 2014 ($30.4 million) was more than the September quarter 2014 ($18.6 million). The value of non-residential buildings approved in the December quarter was $5.6 million, $1.8 million more than the previous quarter ($4.8 million).

In the Livingstone Shire Council area, 391 residential lots were approved in year ending September 2014. This was 44.3% higher than for the year to end of September 2013 (271 lots).

Transport

  • Highest average daily traffic movements, 11,005 vehicles – Yeppoon Rd, 2013.
  • Highest average daily number of heavy vehicles, 1,644 vehicles – Bruce Highway north of Scrubby Creek, 2013
  • Highest number of light vehicles, 10,246 vehicles and highest percentage of light vehicle traffic, 92.9% – Yeppoon Road at Iron Pot Creek
  • Average monthly unleaded petrol prices generally higher than Brisbane
  • During 2012-13, a total of 711,101 passengers passed through Rockhampton Airport

Five major roads provide access to and from Rockhampton. In 2013, the Yeppoon Road at Iron Pot Creek had the highest average daily traffic movements (11,005 vehicles), while the Capricorn Highway had the lowest average daily traffic movements (4,940 vehicles). While some average daily traffic movements have increased since 2012, the Capricorn Highway and the Bruce Highway to the north of Rockhampton saw decreased counts.

Of the five locations selected, the Bruce Highway north of Scrubby Creek had the highest number of heavy vehicles (1,644). The Yeppoon Road at Iron Pot Creek had the highest number of light vehicles (10,246) and the highest percentage of light vehicle traffic (92.9%).

Within the Livingstone Shire Council area in 2013, traffic data collected for the Western Yeppoon-Emu Park road counted 4,552 vehicles in proximity to Emu Park, compared to 6,088 vehicles counted in proximity to Yeppoon. The Keppel Sands Road showed an annual average daily traffic count of 675 vehicles while the Western Yeppoon – Byfield Road counted 1,188 vehicles.

Rockhampton Airport is the major air transport facility servicing the region. Expanded facilities at the airport cater for both domestic and international airlines. During 2012-13, a total of 711,101 passengers passed through Rockhampton Airport. This was a decrease of 5.3% from the 750,633 passengers in 2011-12. The average annual growth rate of passenger movements between 2002–03 and 2012-13 was 13.0%, or an average of 10,202 passengers per year.

Of the total number of passengers travelling in or out of Rockhampton Airport in 2012-13, there were 497,000 domestic passengers and 214,101 regional passengers. This was a 18.5% decrease in the domestic market from 2011-12 and a 35.4% increase in regional passengers.

View / Download Full Report

Media

Photo Gallery

Other CQ regions